Author Archives: mythwriter

About mythwriter

I first started role-playing in 1979 when I happened upon a neighbor/friend playing AD&D with his brother. I was fascinated. We stuck with it until I left for art school in 1980. Within a few months there I had discovered an on-going game that appealed to me, and a couple months after that I started running my own. The creativity of that atmosphere was highly charged. I was bitten and bitten BAD, lol. We couldn’t help tinkering with the rules, being creative types and soon accumulated a notebook full of homebrewed rules. When I came home from school, my attention shifted to the historic basis for the game and I started reading everything medieval I could get my hands on. That started 15 years of research that included spending an entire month plumbing the secrets of our nation’s Library of Congress. THAT was an amazing experience. I and my gaming buddies took the much-polished homebrew (“Realms of Myth”) to a few conventions in the early late 80’s-early 90’s. The last game I ran continued for almost 5 years, during the time I lived in Ohio, one of the most gratifying gaming experiences I have had. A few years ago I pulled the game out of mothballs and looked it over, realizing that MUCH of the research I had done had been neglected. The last couple years have been spent integrating all that information. The latest rewrite is what we are playing now, but stripped down to the basics. The “crunchier” rules are being held in reserve, to be implemented as the game progresses and everyone gets more comfortable with the system. A couple aspects were implemented during character generation to accommodate a few of the players’ needs in creating characters that had a bit more scope to them, however. Realms of Myth will appeal to gamers who appreciate grit and local color in their medieval-based fantasy. The emphasis is definitely on character development and roleplaying. The setting is fantasy but firmly based on England, early to mid 1300's, High Middle Ages. The world IS the way the people of the period believed it was, with a modern fantasy sense of verisimilitude thoroughly integrated.

GMing 101: The Art of Description, Bringing the Fantasy to Life

One of the most important features of the roleplaying game is the descriptions by which the GM brings the adventures and the gameworld itself to life for the players.  For the gameworld to be believable to the players, the GM … Continue reading

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A Few Words About Character Mortality & Realms of Myth

Unlike some other Swords & Sorcery roleplaying games, the options for bringing a dead character back to the world of the living are limited in RoM and are among the most rare and difficult magicks to find (being of the … Continue reading

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Roleplaying 101: How the Game is Played

The first requirement to roleplay successfully is for the participants to want to make the game work and to have fun with it. Like watching any science-fiction or (medieval) Swords & Sorcery movie, or reading any books of the same … Continue reading

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Clarifying Definitions: Some Common Medieval Weapons

The historic basis of the equipment available in swords n sorcery roleplaying games, cannot be denied, but over the years it has become a mishmash of poorly understood terms among roleplayers and roleplaying games in general. I am simply seeking … Continue reading

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The Lay of the Land: Directions, Maps and Mapping

Had a discussion with a prospective player about maps of the game world. He was new to the world as player and character, and asked if he would be able to see a map “to contemplate character things”. I’m not … Continue reading

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Virtue and Vice: For Those Whom “Alignments” Just Don’t Fit Anymore

In the same manner as “attributes” are used in various guises and forms across the gamut in TRPG’s to describe the physical and spiritual faculties, capacities, and abilities of the character, there are aspects of the personality that are conspicuous … Continue reading

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Making the Most of Combat

Also known as “The Art of Being a Hero”, the players and GM alike must be careful not to turn tactical play, and especially combat, into a very dry strategy-type board- or wargame. This is a very real danger when … Continue reading

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Realms of Myth: Conditions of Daily Life 2. In the Marketplace

In Character Generation, the player is treated to a relatively pleasant stroll through some rosters of adventure gear and tools, weapons, armor, and the like, all laid out for his convenience with easy set prices and no need for roleplaying … Continue reading

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Taking the Long View: The Perpetually Medieval Game World

When people talk about the Middle Ages, or medieval era, what they are generally referring to is the period from the retreat of the Roman Empire from England in the middle of the first millennium or the Viking invasions of … Continue reading

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Avoiding Anachronisms in Medieval TRPG settings

While playing his character, the player should make an effort to look at the situations presented by the GM from the character’s point of view and try to suppress his knowledge of the modern world, to assume the frame of … Continue reading

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